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The life of Bees

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Bees pollinate flowers, which provide us with:

crops for food icon

Crops for food

Food and habitat for wildlife

Biofuel

Green
and flowered spaces

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Food and habitat for wildlife icon
biofuel icon
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making honey
fanning bee
larva
raw honey
propolis
propolis bee

Bees make honey, which can be eaten straight from the hive, known as “raw honey”.  It has natural anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-septic, anti-biotic and

anti-bacterial properties!

As well as honey, bees naturally produce propolis, wax. Propolis

is used as a natural glue to mend the hive and seal cracks but has remarkable health benefits for

us humans.

Helenium SEF
Pot Marjoram
Helenium Autumnale

Research has shown that honeybees have favourite flowers!

The top 5 to plant to help provide pollen for honeybees and

a splash of colour to your garden are:

Pot Marjoram

Helenium Autumnale

Helenium SEF

Calamint

Sedum Spectabile

Calamint
Sedum Spectabile

Honey is made by mixing pollen and a special enzyme with saliva. The mixture is secreted into a cell and fanned with the bee’s wings to remove excess water. Once it is the consistency of honey the cells are sealed.

When a queen lays an egg she decides whether it is a female or a male. The worker bees then feed that larvae with pollen. If a new queen is needed, the worker bees
will exclusively feed the larvae royal jelly.

We’ve adopted a beehive with Bees for Business, as part of their project to reverse the decline of the honeybee by installing 250 beehives over 5 years on their organic farm.

 

Learn more and adopt your
own business beehive at www.BeesforBusiness.com

bees for business logo
Bronco logo

There’s Always a Solution

Creative Digital Marketing Agency

 

 

www.bronco.co.uk   |  sales@bronco.co.uk   |  01765 608530

 

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Honeybees have been recorded flying at more than 18,000 feet!
The number of honeybee hives has declined from approximately 1 million hives in 1900 to around only 270,000 hives in 2015.
Each honeybee produces around 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime - that’s a lot of bees required to produce a jar of honey!
Each honeybee will visit as many as 100 flowers when collecting pollen, flying as far as 3 miles from the hive.
It is estimated that 1/3 of the crops we ate rely on pollination by the honeybee.
In the height of summer a honeybee colony can contain as many as 80,000 - 100,000 bees, compared to around just 20,000 over winter.
Honeybees will fill any space they choose to live in with honeycomb and honey.
A honeybee colony is made up of worker bees, who are all female, drones, who are all male and one queen. Only the female bees sting and they
A female worker bee, whose role is to collect pollen and nectar, lives for only around 6 weeks but the queen can live for up to 4 years.
Bees make the hexagonal wax cells called “honeycomb” to store both the queen’s laid eggs but also honey stores.
They make the cells not only almost perfectly symmetrical and identical but at an agnle of approximately 13  degrees, to ensure the contents doe